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Posts Tagged ‘quit smoking’

Quit Contest Offers $5,000 In Cash Prizes

In Local News on August 4, 2010 at 9:15 am

WASHINGTON, Ind. – Officials representing the Daviess County Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Coalition are making an all-out effort to raise community awareness about the benefits of smoke free air and will be encouraging smokers to pledge to quit using tobacco and take a chance at winning a grand prize of $2,500.

First introduced in 2007, the “Quit Now Indiana” contest is designed to encourage any Hoosier resident 18 years or older and who is a regular smoker to quit using tobacco from Sept. 1st to Sept. 30th. The top prize winner, who successfully quits smoking from September 1st to September 30th, 2010, and whose name is randomly drawn, will receive $2,500 as the grand prize winner. The second and third place winners will receive $1,500 and $1,000, respectively.

In addition to signing up online at www.INShape.IN.gov and www.quitnowindiana.com, tobacco users can sign up at boxes placed in various locations around the county. The contest boxes will also be at such events as the 2010 Indiana State Fair and the 1-800-QUIT-NOW Concert Series at the Lawn at White River State Park in Indianapolis. The entry deadline is August 23rd.

According to Sally Petty, coordinator of the Daviess County Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Coalition, this year’s contest will have a focus on encouraging people to quit with an additional focus on outreach through employers. The coalition is providing posters and information to businesses throughout the county with information about the Quit Now Indiana Contest and how to register.

Data shows that an employer with a workforce of at least 500 people will spend as much as $400,000 annually on costs related to tobacco use by their employees. The coalition has additional information available for business owners and managers about how to reduce costs related to employee tobacco use.

Hoosier employers are invited to become a Preferred Employer with the Indiana Tobacco Quitline (1-800-QUIT-NOW), a free quit service offered through ITPC. For more information concerning the Preferred Employer program, contact ITPC at (317) 234-1787. Or, contact Petty at 812-698-0232.

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Military Marches Forward to Curb Tobacco Use

In National News on April 30, 2010 at 2:48 pm

The facts are: rates of smoking in the military are higher than in the civilian population; smoking rates are even higher among military personnel who have been deployed; and an increasing number of service members use smokeless tobacco products. In light of this, the Departments of Defense (DoD) and Veterans Affairs (VA) are working to increase cessation among their constituents.

A June 2009 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report commissioned by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the DoD titled, “Combating Tobacco Use in Military and Veteran Populations,” includes recommendations for the DoD and VA to make progress toward a tobacco-free military.

The Department of Defense (DoD) has launched an online interactive tobacco cessation program — Quit Tobacco, Make Everyone Proud.   The program provides users the opportunity to submit questions to tobacco cessation counselors in real time; computer games to distract from tobacco cravings; and short videos and audio podcasts — quitcasts and spitcasts — in which service members share testimonials and advice.

A military-specific tobacco quitline is being tested in an NIH-sponsored clinical trial.  The principal investigator for the trial, Dr. Robert Klesges of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, says, “A tobacco quitline or a tailored Internet program, military personnel can use anytime day or night. So a lot of what we are doing is tailoring these cessation tools to the intense job demands associated with the military,” He further noted, “We enforce weight standards, why wouldn’t we enforce tobacco-free standards?”

All VA medical centers have tobacco cessation specialty clinics that provide free counseling and FDA-approved smoking cessation medications, including over-the-counter medications.  Veterans seen in primary care and outpatient mental health clinics are screened for tobacco use at least once a year. Providers offer brief cessation counseling to current tobacco users, as well as prescriptions for FDA-approved medications and referrals to more intensive counseling to assist veterans with quitting.

No Smoking Flash Mob

In National News on April 28, 2010 at 10:12 am

Help Mom Quit Smoking For Mother’s Day, Women’s Health Week

In Local News on April 27, 2010 at 7:59 am

National Women's Health Week - May 9-15, 2010 - It's Your Time!

Women’s Health Week is coming up the week of Mother’s Day on May 9, and May is also Clean Air Month. Perhaps the best Mother’s Day gift you could give your mom is resources to quit smoking. Tell her about the Indiana Tobacco Quitline, 1-800-QUIT-NOW, where she can get free coaching and put together a quit plan.

Here’s how you can help a friend or family member quit:

  • Express care. Skip the criticism.
  • Remember the smoker will need to make the decision.
  • Ask how you can help.
  • Be patient with mood swings.
  • Be “on call” to offer support during tough spots.
  • Offer encouragement regularly.
  • Encourage non-smoking activities.
  • If you smoke, don’t smoke around the person who is trying to quit, and consider quitting with them.
  • Be prepared for slips. It usually takes more than 5 tries for a smoker to quit for good.
  • Keep up the support.

Moms, what better gift could you give your kids than to quit smoking and extend your lifetime with them.

Some tips to quit smoking:

  • Call 1-800-QUIT NOW.
  • Make a list. Write down why you want to stop smoking.
  • Pick a good time to quit. Avoid times when you will be under a lot of stress, especially holidays.
  • Throw out all cigarettes, ashtrays and lighters from your home and car.
  • Consider changing your daily routine. For example, take a different route to work or school.
  • Drink lots of water, eat a balanced diet and get plenty of sleep and avoid alcohol.
  • Get support. Tell family, friends and coworkers that you are going to quit. Ask that they not smoke around you or leave cigarettes out where you can see them. Maybe even get one of them to quit with you.
  • Be aware that you may not quit on the first try. Most smokers need a few practice runs to quit for good. Be patient but persistent and try to learn something from each quit attempt that can make your next attempt successful.
  • Be prepared for difficult situations and side effects. Some may experience depression, irritability and headaches.
  • Talk with your health care provider. Consider getting help by attending cessation classes and using medications.
  • Keep busy! Exercise every day, even if it’s just going for a walk. Make a list of what you are going to do instead of smoke. Do something you enjoy.

Lessons From Obama

In Local News on March 2, 2010 at 9:39 am

Whether or not you agree with President Obama as a political figure, we can learn from his struggles with smoking. Doctors recently advised Obama to continue with his quest to quit smoking, and Press Secretary Robert Gibbs says he has quit, except for the occasional “fall off the wagon,” and continues to use nicotine gum.

Most people have to try five or 10 times to quit smoking for good. It’s like dealing with any other addiction; even after you quit, you have to consciously maintain that quit. The President has likely the most stressful job in the world, and if he can find the willpower to continue his quit, you can too. Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW to put together a plan to quit, manage withdrawal symptoms, and stay quit.

Remember whenever you are tempted, the Four D’s: Delay, Drink water, Do something else, and Deep breathing.

It Really Works!

In Local News on March 1, 2010 at 11:29 am

As I was handing out posters about the Indiana Tobacco Quitline last week, I ran into a young woman at a hair salon who said she had called the quitline … and had been quit for a month! She said the quit coaches were extremely helpful in putting together a plan to quit and stay quit, and I congratulated her on her success.

Later that afternoon, I was talking to a man at a local mechanical shop who seemed interested in what the Quitline had to offer. He asked, “So does it actually work?”

I was able to give an emphatic yes and explain how the highly trained quit coaches and other support offered by the quitline, like nicotine replacement therapy and online support, had helped many people like that young lady quit.

What can it hurt to give it a try? It’s free and it works. Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW. There’s never been a better time to quit.

Cigarette Consumption Has Decreased

In State News on February 22, 2010 at 9:51 am

Since 2000, cigarette consumption has declined by 36% in Indiana. Cigarette consumption is calculated based on per-pack sales and provides an estimate of “how” much Hoosiers are smoking. Indiana has long had one of the highest smoking consumption rates in the country. The decrease of consumption, particularly in the last 2 years, is a strong indicator that Hoosiers are changing their smoking behavior. For free coaching to help you quit smoking, call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

Tips On How To Quit Smoking

In Local News on January 25, 2010 at 10:11 am
  • Call 1-800-QUIT NOW. Indiana’s Tobacco Quitline
  • Make a list. Write down why you want to stop smoking.
  • Pick a good time to quit. Avoid times when you will be under a lot of stress, especially holidays.
  • Throw out all cigarettes, ashtrays and lighters from your home and car.
  • Consider changing your daily routine. For example, take a different route to work or school.
  • Drink lots of water, eat a balanced diet and get plenty of sleep and avoid alcohol.
  • Get support. Tell family, friends and coworkers that you are going to quit. Ask that they not smoke around you orleave cigarettes out where you can see them. Maybe even get one of them to quit with you.
  • Be aware that you may not quiton the first try. Most smokers need a few practice runs to quit for good. Be patient,but persistent.
  • Be prepared for difficult situations and side effects. Some may experience depression, irritability and headaches.
  • Talk with your health care provider. Consider getting help by attending cessation classes and using medications.
  • Keep busy! Exercise every day, even if it’s just going for a walk. Make a list of what you are going to do instead ofsmoke. Do something you enjoy!

American Cancer Society, ITPC Mark 34th Great American Smokeout by Encouraging Smokers to Quit

In Local News on November 18, 2009 at 8:54 am

As the official sponsor of birthdays, the American Cancer Society marks the 34th Great American Smokeout on November 19 by encouraging smokers to use the date to make a plan to quit, or to plan in advance and quit smoking that day. By doing so, smokers will be taking an important step towards a healthier life – one that can lead to reducing cancer risk and creating more birthdays.

In honor of the Great American Smokeout, the Daviess and Pike Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Coalitions are providing stickers with the Indiana Tobacco Quitline logo and phone number to several pizza restaurants and pharmacies in the area.

Researchers say that quitting smoking can increase life expectancy – smokers who quit at age 35 gain an average of eight years of life expectancy; those who quit at age 55 gain about five years; and even long term smokers who quit at 65 gain three years. Smokers who want to quit can call the Indiana Tobacco Quitline at 1-800-QUIT-NOW for tobacco cessation and coaching services that can help increase their chances of quitting for good.

Research shows that people who stop smoking before age 50 can cut their risk of dying in the next 15 years in half compared with those who continue to smoke. Smokers who quit also reduce their risk of lung cancer – 10 years after quitting, the lung cancer death rate is about half that of a continuing smoker’s. Some of the health effects of quitting are almost instant, too – heart rate and blood pressure drop 20 minutes after quitting.

“There’s no better time to quit than now,” said Sally Petty, Indiana Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Project Coordinator for Daviess and Pike counties. “It can improve your health – and the health of your wallet. The average smoker spends more than $2,000 per year on cigarettes.”

Important facts about tobacco use:

  • Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the U.S.
  • Cigarette smoking accounts for about 443,000 premature deaths – including 49,400 in nonsmokers.
  • Thirty percent of cancer deaths, including 87 percent of lung cancer deaths, can be attributed to tobacco.
  • Smoking also accounts for $193 billion in health care expenditures and productivity losses.
  • Great progress is being made in reducing tobacco use in the U.S., with adult smoking rates in 2007 declining among all adults to 19.8 percent.

Chewing Tobacco Does Not Help Smokers Quit

In State News on October 8, 2009 at 9:17 am

Fact_258Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW for free coaching and support to quit using tobacco.